An inclusive society is a stronger one.

Let’s consider three important components to reaching this goal:

Education– Take time to learn of interests, backgrounds and abilities while keeping an open mind. This applies to teachers, employers, & neighbors regardless of age and economic status

Communication– A big problem is fear of the unknown; it can make people uncomfortable. The easiest solution is to start an ongoing dialogue then continue the conversation.

Integration– This is the goal to reaching a strong, successful, united nation. Everyone has something to offer that’s new to you. Diversity offers new insights to issues and challenges.

I am Susan Schaffer. I have a physical disability since birth. I created and implemented disability awareness programs for professionals, the community, and consumers for over 30 years. Contact me to schedule programs for individuals and groups. at 484-425-7587.

Strategies for Disability Dialogue

  • Talk directly to the individual.
  • Give the person the option of shaking hands.
  • When talking with someone who is blind identify yourself.
  • If you offer to help ask a person if they want it first.
  • Do not use the person’s first name unless you are friends.
  • A wheelchair is in the person’s personal space so don’t lean on it.
  • Ask yes/no questions if the person has speech difficulties.
  • If the person is deaf, shoulder tap will alert him or her.
  • Don’t be nervous talking with a person who has a challenge.